27
Jun

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Written by Sarah. Posted in holiday, life, new york city

I’d planned a knitting post for today but yesterday was just so overwhelming with awesome that it’s going to have to wait. I couldn’t be happier and I just want to bask in that a little bit longer!

stonewall

When I heard the news about DOMA yesterday, I wished I was in DC waving a rainbow flag on the steps of the Supreme Court. I’m sick of my “where were you when…” stories ending with “at my desk, I read it on Twitter.”  So when my friend Max asked if I wanted to go to the Stonewall Inn with him after work, I was so excited.

I happen to work just a short stroll from Stonewall which is so bizarre to me. New York is weird like that. The city has changed so much since the riots happened 44 years ago and, aside a few recent news articles about hate crimes against gays in the village, it’s an incredibly diverse and welcoming place. It’s strange to think that a place I pass by on the way to grab a sandwich is the site of a catalyst for the pride movement.

equality

When we arrived, Cher was blasting and all of Christopher Street from 7th to Waverly was blocked off. People were handing out flags and stickers and everyone was hugging and smiling. Edie Windsor gave a speech, saying how proud her late wife Thea would have been and my eyes just filled with tears. I was watching history. It felt like a long time coming but finally, it was here. It was hot and the speakers were too loud but I was just so happy to be there, celebrating with all of these other people. I was proud to be an ally and to have supported in the ways that I could. And I was just elated that my friends and family could be treated as they deserved and that justice was served as it so seldom is. It was really magical.

At the same time, I knew that there was more to be done. Chris Christie still vows to veto any gay marriage bills that may pass again in my home state of New Jersey (sounds like he could use a hug from Corey Booker). Some state constitutions define marriage as only heterosexual which may prevent same sex couples living in those states to receive these new benefits. There is still a long way to go. I was raised to be keenly aware that injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. And if you’ve been following the news this week, you’ll see that there is still a lot of injustice being doled out by the same people who made this decision. So we can’t give up fighting. There’s still a lot to fix in this world but I think we all deserve a break to dance in the street, to celebrate these victories!

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28
May

Tiny Sheep

Written by Sarah. Posted in design, kollabora, life, summer, want

How was your long weekend? I basically did nothing but knit and switch between Doctor Who and Battlestar Galactica while drinking beer and eating bacon jam. I actually feel guilty about how awesome it was. But I can’t show you much of what I’m working on because (!!!) it’s a design for Holla Knits’ Fall/Winter collection! Isn’t that awesome? You’re all going to love it.

Between long stretches of knitting, I gave myself a break to check instgram (I have an addiction) and play a game that I’ve become totally obsessed with called Tiny Sheep. I decided to just come out and write about it here because I like to remind you that I am still a 15-year-old girl on the inside and I’m especially shameless when knitting is involved even in the slightest.

tiny sheep

Tiny Sheep is an iPhone game (also available for Android) in which players run a sheep farm. It’s time-based so things grow and work while you’re away from the game. It’s a lot like those other annoying games that I was crazy about for a week and then completely abandoned. (I’m looking at you, Farmville. Guys, I played Farmville for a while. It was not the coolest thing I’ve ever done.)

But this time I can be a shepherd on my phone with pink sheep. Pink sheep!

I’m fertilizing grass and sheering sheep and spinning their wool into sweaters and Ugg boots (yeah, I don’t know). It’s pretty addictive. I’m pretty sure that this free app was developed entirely for my own amusement. Like a game of my dream life if my dream life were a game. I’ve never been interested in playing a game where I virtually knit things. I’m not really big into gaming in general because it takes my hands away from knitting. (I do love to watch other people play while I knit, though. Seriously. And when I do game, I get carried away.) But I like that this is a game of management and a lot of patience instead of marathon playing. And I like to dream about being a shepherd even if I have to be one on my coffee breaks at work.

Did I mention there are pink sheep?

ps. The final set of instructions for the Michelle Collar are up on Kollabora! If you were waiting for the whole thing, feel free to cast on now! What are you waiting for?

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17
May

We Have to Talk About It

Written by Sarah. Posted in DIY, life

The factory collapse.

I wasn’t going to write about this because I don’t really know what to say. I like to keep things light hearted around here but my heart feels so heavy. I don’t like to write about things that make people sad especially on a Friday because I am a fun distraction from the work you’re supposed to be doing or the laundry you don’t feel like folding. But I can’t keep it in any longer. I don’t really know how to put it into words and I’m not sure if I’m the one who should say anything. I don’t know the history and I don’t work in the industry. But I keep seeing the numbers rise and every time I do, my heart aches.

As someone who makes clothing, even just as a hobby, maybe, especially because it’s a hobby, because for us it’s frivolous and trendy, I feel like I should say something because I know. I know what it takes to make a piece of clothing. I know that it’s not magic. I know that it’s a craft. I’m sure that I’m preaching to the choir here. But this is where my soap box is located.

Being a part of the DIY movement which is in full swing today, especially in Brooklyn, people are starting to get back to the root of it all. Where does our food come from? How is furniture made? What things can I create with my own hands instead of paying a big company? I like being part of that. Because I feel like I’m more aware of what I’m putting on/in/around my body and I can better appreciate what I have. It’s gotten me in touch with countless other women who have sat down to make things today and over the course of history. It’s reminded me of my great-grandfather who cut patterns in the garment district and my grandmother who made my kindergarden Halloween costume. It’s big.

In fact, I enjoy the thought of someone halfway around the world living a life so very different than mine making something that effects my life. That, even though we don’t speak the same language, we are connected because we both know how to make something that you wear. But I can’t come to terms with the fact that so many people are exploited and certainly a number of them are putting their lives on the line.

When I saw this photograph, I cried. (I thought about posting it here but I think it deserves a warning. But please look at it. It’s very powerful and important.) I thought to myself that I could never buy a regular piece of clothing again. That blood was on my hands. That’s incredibly dramatic and also unrealistic but seeing this photograph made me immediately sit down with tears in my eyes and write this. I’ll admit it: I’m going to buy clothing and I alone am not responsible. We have a broken system.

So what can we do?

Here’s what I plan to do. It’s four steps and they don’t seem very big but this is it.

1. Buy less, make more. I’m not going to pretend I have enough time to make everything that I want to wear. But when I do buy, it won’t just be furiously hoarding sale items into my shopping cart and crossing my fingers that they fit. I am going to make sure what I’m purchasing is something that I need and that I love. Pieces that are simple and versatile and timeless. I’ll be honest with myself: while I’d love to always be on trend, it’s just not that important to my life and the greater good. And I think that we can all agree that we’d love to have more dollars in our wallets and room in our closets. Of course, I’ll supplement my wardrobe as I always have by making pieces that I put care and thought into – garments that I’ll be sure to keep for the rest of my life.

2. Make do and mend. I have lots of cheap clothing that I bought years ago and some that I got last season. None of these $5 tees are not supposed to last long. You get what you pay for. But I’m going to stretch those items as long as I can. I’m going to fix holes and add buttons and I’ll do my hardest to make adjustments even though I’m a novice. I’ll care for these pieces as best as I can when it comes to laundry and storage and I’ll always look out for hand-me-downs and vintage pieces even if they need updating and love.

3. Speak up. I don’t just mean writing blog posts where I preach to you guys. That would be annoying. Like I said, I can’t go the rest of my life not buying clothing. Of course, I hope to be buying from companies that are small and local as much as I can afford. After the collapse, I read a lot about what I could do, where I should be shopping. A lot of new stores are on my radar and I want to share them with my friends. But one article said that garment makers fear boycotts because a drop in revenue can cause workers to lose the jobs that pay them the little money that they need to survive. But I’m not just going to use that as an excuse for lazy consumerism. I plan to get in touch with companies that I buy from and let them know how I feel. The customer is always right, right? I’m going to demand that they be transparent and ethical because I do love their clothing and I do want to buy it. I’m going to tell them that I don’t mind paying more. That they can count on me if I can count on them. I’m going to tell the companies that produce in the US or pay their workers living wages that I appreciate what they’re doing and that I want them to keep up the good work and that I’m happy to spend money with them. It sounds idealistic but maybe if enough of us do it, we can make a change.

4. Teach others. To make, of course. If you teach a man to fish, he can eat for the rest of his life. Each piece that they make on their own is one less that they have to buy and you can pat yourself on the back for that – for teaching someone how to do it for themselves and helping them understand the effort that goes into making clothes. Let’s all dedicate ourselves to starting the cycle of buying less and making more and mending what we have by showing others how good it feels to make a piece of clothing from start to finish.

These are the small things that I can afford to do. I wish they were enough but I think it’s a good start. And if I ever find myself coveting a piece of clothing I should otherwise not purchase, I’m going to take a long, hard look at that photo because I think that sometimes I need to remind myself of my priorities.

What will you do to help fix what’s broken?

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07
May

I’m Still Making This Thing

Written by Sarah. Posted in cross stitch, embroidery, gift, holiday, life

Remember when I was making a cool Zelda cross stitch as a belated Christmas present for my cousin who is a really awesome? Surprise! It’s still not finished! Surprise again! I’m the worst.

zelda cross stitch

I don’t have much to say since it’s really more of the same but I did feel like this poor thing deserved an update. I’ve been sharing photos on instagram between pics of the Williamsburg Bridge (get used to those!). I won’t pretend like I’ve been slaving away at this piece. I’ve actually had it packed away since we moved but I’ve been between knitting projects so I thought I’d give it some time while I waited for some yarn to arrive.

As torturous and mind melting as it can be, I have become a little addicted to cross stitching. I decided to skip right to the good parts with this session and start working on the title letters. Of course, they actually ended up being wonky. Somewhere along the line I miscounted or maybe I stitched a few too many in a place where they shouldn’t have been? In the end, I had to squeeze the E in a little. It looks noticeable here but it won’t once the shadow is added (I really hope). The shadow makes everything really pop and look like magic.

When I put this down last, I was starting to have a panic attack that I’d run out of room at the top. I obviously had no idea what I was doing when I started this thing. Now I’m not so worried or maybe I’m just so fed up with this insanity that I just don’t care.

I have some deadlines coming up so I have a feeling this is as far as this sad excuse for embroidery will get for another few months. I’d like to keep working at it and I can at least mindlessly fill in the pink background while I’m watching Mad Men. I have the Lon Lon Ranch song stuck in my head right now. I’d really love to finish this thing because then I can brag about it forever.

Has a project every driven you crazy? Do you think cross stitch is fun or tedious? Will this ever be finished?

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29
Apr

What’s in Your Notion Bag?

Written by Sarah. Posted in knits, life, photos

Thought I’d do a little spring cleaning this weekend and go through my notions bag. I keep my notions bag, as I do most of my WIPs, knocking around under the coffee table. Usually there’s a bunch of crap spilling out of it onto the floor or a pile of magazines. One day I will get it all together and my knitting life will be beautiful and tidy.

Until then, at least it’s all in one bag…

This brought the perfect opportunity to share with you what I do have in my dandy little  notions bag. Here’s a little inventory of the rag tag band that helps me do the dirty work:

notions bag

-2 tape measures
-stitch holders
-a yarn cutter that looks like a ninja star that I once wore on a ribbon as a necklace in high school (what a loser!)
-teeny tiny scissors on a keychain
-yarn “bras”
-a bunch of yarn labels because I hoard them and promise to paste them into a notebook one day and then usually I just throw them out
-toy button eyes
-regular old buttons
-an exacto knife?
-tags for knitted gifts
-a bunch of tapestry needles I can never find because they’re alway at the bottom of the bag
-stitch markers and little containers for them
-a paper clip I used as a stitch marker once when I couldn’t find those stitch markers
-an impromptu cardboard pom pom maker
-bobby pins?
-a bunch of scrap yarn that I use as stitch holders but refuse to throw out in case I need stitch holders because I hate cutting good yarn for scraps
-cable needles
-an old school stitch counter that I probably haven’t used in years and was actually surprised to find
-a gauge ruler/needle size thingy
-3 wrist support gloves (fourth is MIA.) not sure where I got the second pair though

And finally my nifty notions bag which my awesome Aunt Sherry got me (actually, she got me a bunch of the notions pictured above!). It’s got this crazy collage thing going on with clippings from probably a billion magazines and such.

The first notion bag I ever bought was a pencil case with rainbow hearts on it. I paid for it in the cafe at Barnes and Noble in high school because that’s where I did a lot of hanging out. Good times! Before that I was using a make up bag my mom got with some kind of Clinique gift set.

Anyway, that’s a lot of talk about notions. Where do you keep your notions? What’s a must for your notions bag? What am I missing!? And where did that damn tapestry needle go?!

ps. Thanks, everyone for entering the Craftsy giveaway! So great to hear what everyone is interested in learning about! I’ll be emailing winners soon with the info soon so check your emails!

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19
Apr

FO: Hurrication Fair Isle Sweater

Written by Sarah. Posted in embroidery, faire isle, FO, knits, life, photos, style, sweater, yarn

It’s finally here. Let this be a disclaimer that I’m ridiculously excited about how this sweater turned out. I’ve spent so much time on it that I’ve gotten something of a Stockholm Syndrome towards it. I’m in love with it and I’m so proud and I just want to wear it all of the time. So now I’m going to talk about my deep love for this sweater which is totally weird and I apologize if it’s incoherent. Just look at the pretty pictures (thanks for taking them, as always, Jon!).

fair isle

In case you’re just tuning in now, I’ll tell you a little bit about this sweater. I was really drawn to this pattern when I first saw it in Debbie Bliss magazine last summer. I don’t know why but I really felt like I wanted to challenge myself with some intense, detailed, and tiny fair isle. (Knit on size 3s, I must’ve been drunk when I used the word “challenge.”) And I knew it would be a great addition to my wardrobe. I was obsessed with doing a neutral/neon fair isle. This would be the one.

When I started knitting this, I had a whole week off of work (hurrication). I spent about 8 hours a day in front of the Netflix knitting, so the first sleeve was finished in three days. I guess that’s when the cabin fever started to set in. Everything near us had power but there really wasn’t much we wanted or needed to do. The park was closed so we just had to take walks around the block until we felt uncomfortable and ran back inside to hide on the couch. It was a weird week. But I got a huge chunk of this sweater finished and if I hadn’t, I probably would have been too discouraged to press on.

fair isle

I made a lot of other things since I cast on in the end of October. A few Christmas presents, a few birthday presents, two new patterns. I even finished a second sock. I moved from Manhattan to Brooklyn. I wrote a lot here. I think pacing myself with other projects kept me coming back to this guy.

Towards the end was when things got rough. There were a lot of ends to weave in. A LOT. There was a lot of seaming to be done (because, as I’ve mentioned a million times, it’s knit flat). And then, just as I was coming to the home stretch of being able to wear this damn sweater, I remembered that I had to tackle the embroidery. And I just really wanted to wear the freaking thing.

fair isle front

I finished a few days before our trip to Chicago. I could not be happier with how the blocking turned out. I know I’d expressed my nervousness regarding the fit before. Everything was super tight and small and weird when I was knitting but the blocking made all of the pieces fit perfectly and the colorwork sits so neatly. BLOCKING IS MAGIC, GUYS. The sweater is designed as a 3/4 sleeve that is a bit cropped. I knit it cropped but it lengthened during blocking which I’m pleased with. I’m not a big fan of 3/4 sleeves so I made them a bit longer and, again, blocking put them right into place.

Let me take a minute to talk about this yarn. (Are you tired of me obsessing over every detail on this sweater?) I’m devastated that St Denis has been discontinued. The Boreale yarn is probably my favorite thing I’ve ever worked with. It’s soft and delicate and every colorway is gorgeous. It’s warm but it’s not itchy and it has a great drape without being limp or droopy. But this is it. Whatever yarn is left over is going to sit in my stash, probably for the rest of my life, waiting for the PERFECT project that will never come because I will never think anything is perfect enough for it. You know that feeling? Until then, I will be scouring the internet, hoarding all of the St Denis yarn I can find. (Drop me a line if you have any leads or would like to tell me about a magical company that is rebooting the brand or if you’d like to just pour one out with me.)

fair isle back

Long story short, I’m very much a process knitter so long, drawn-out knits are not my thing. I’m constantly on the look out for new patterns and always planning the next project. I’ve knit plenty of sweaters and I can’t pick a favorite because they all mean something different to me. But this sweater is something special. I feel like I really conquered it. I don’t think I was ever afraid of the challenge, I was excited by it. It was kind of like the scene in Kill Bill when Uma Thurman has to battle the Crazy 88 and she knows that she has to do it and she kicks everyone’s ass but it’s totally exhausting and she’s bleeding and everything at the end of it all. Finishing this sweater gave me an immense feeling of accomplishment and satisfaction. It’s kind of the War and Peace of sweaters.

I’m also finding that with every piece that I knit, I see my evolution. And I don’t necessarily mean in skill level (although I’m constantly trying to choose patterns that challenge and teach me). Every piece that I make is more and more of me – better fit and colors, pieces that fit into my personal style better. I’m figuring out what my style is as a knitter and which patterns and yarns speak to me.

And that’s what it’s all about, right?

What’s the biggest knitting challenge you’ve given yourself? Do you find yourself evolving as a knitter?

ps. There’s still plenty of time to get in on the Craftsy giveaway. Check it out!

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08
Apr

New Pattern: Olivia Hat

Written by Sarah. Posted in FO, hat, knits, life, photos

Last month I got the urge to design a hat pattern. I don’t know what came over me but I wanted to work something up and go for it. I had grand dreams of writing up my sock patterns and sizing them and releasing them properly, too. (That didn’t happen but never say never.) I immediately went out and bought yarn and I worked on for a weekend, basically non-stop. And although that doesn’t sound like enough time to spend on a new design, I was pleased with the result. Francesca was nice enough to give it a whirl and here it is!

olivia

 

This is my first hat pattern! It’s a chunky, whimsical design with a folded brim and bobbles. I hear that chunky knit hats are going to be a big deal next winter. The Purl Soho Super Soft Merino comes in colors that are perfect for spring, too, or for cheering up a dreary winter. Pom poms are optional but I made one from some stashed Tosh Merino.

olivia 2

 

I’ve actually been nervous to release this. That anxious voice in the back of my head thinks that everyone will hate it (it almost feels like something a kid would wear but my old roommate said that I dress like Abigail Breslin in Little Miss Sunshine) or no one will want to sit next to me in the cafeteria. That being said, I’ve been tired of knitting my own patterns and not putting them out there for others. Just like my hand warmer pattern (and another upcoming project for Kollabora!), it’s a fun challenge taking the barely legible doodles and notes that are good enough for me and refining them so that others can follow them and not think that I’m crazy.

Other than that, I’ve been wearing this hat since I made it and I really love it. It is pretty much made of happiness.

You can purchase the Olivia Hat pattern here on Ravelry. I’d love to hear what you think about it and see your version.

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04
Apr

Summer Knitting

Written by Sarah. Posted in DIY, embroidery, instagram, knits, kollabora, life, sewing, summer

What will we do when the weather warms up? That’s what we ask ourselves when spring starts to shine out from behind a harsh winter.

I am not a seasonal knitter. I knit all damn year. I’d knit on the beach if I went to beaches. I am certainly guilty of knitting poolside. A lot of non-knitters laugh when I buy yarn in July. It seems like prime time to cast on a cardigan to me. In fact, I feel the need to rush when I have an opportunity to wear what I’m making so there’s a little less pressure on summer knitting. But if a sweater is finished early, I can wear it to the office to fight off overzealous air conditioning. Of course, there’s nothing like the first cool breeze in October to really make my heart ache for wool socks on my needles. But I certainly don’t slow down when the mercury rises.

Now, when it comes to my other crafts, those are certainly seasonal. In colder months, I can’t bring myself to embroider when there are sweaters to be knit.

I picked up sewing last summer but once the weather turned, I began to neglect my sewing machine. I plan on doing more sewing this summer and I’d like to continue teaching myself into the fall but first I have to learn how to sew sleeves. I don’t see myself making tank tops in December.

What about you? Are you a seasonal crafter?

PS. I had the pleasure of interviewing the lovely Threadpanda for Kollabora’s DIY BFF. Check it out here!

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02
Apr

Stashed: Yarns from the Second City

Written by Sarah. Posted in knits, life, travel, yarn

Let me preface this post by saying that not all of these yarns were actually produced in Chicago. What I mean by the title of this post is that I bought these skeins while I was on my trip. I might’ve gone overboard. But I like to give my money to local yarn stores even when they’re not local to me. I want to help make sure that they stick around for my sister knitters! It’s my duty. Also, I was on vacation. And my mom always says that I can buy whatever I want when I’m on vacation. She’s smart.

stash chicago 2

On my second day in Chi-town, I visited Loopy Yarns. They have a whole room for hand dyed and hand painted yarns. That’s where I spent most of my time. I was really drawn to the Miss Babs yarns. I hadn’t seen any of it in person. All of the colorways were really gorgeous and unique. As is true for my form, I decided to get a skein of sock yarn. (As I’ve said before, I like to buy sock yarn when I’m buying stash enhancements since I can usually at least get a pair of socks out of it. There’s usually enough yardage for one pair so I don’t have to splurge on multiple skeins. I feel like I can buy a tasting, if you will, of yarns. And it actually gets used instead of just living in my stash for forever.) It’s a really soft merino yarn. Once I’d picked my favorite, about three other women came in and one after the other announced, “I heard you just got some Miss Babs! I’m here for the Miss Babs!” I knew I’d made the right choice. I think I might make Jon a pair of socks with this salmon color. I know what you’re thinking but I think pink socks look awesome on men! (Exhibits AB, and C.)

I was just going to stop at the skein of Miss Babs but in the sale section I saw this Lorna’s Laces Helen’s Lace. I had to buy it. (Also Jon said I should treat myself. He’s smart, too.) Aside from the price and it being a beautiful skein of silk and merino, Lorna’s Laces is based in Chicago so how could I not buy a Chicago yarn so close to the source? (Side note: I would have loved to have seen their studio but I’m not sure if they do any tours/visits. If I’m ever back I’ll have to explore that. Their yarns are so pretty, I’d love to just give them a high five.) I don’t really knit lacey lace things so I was hoping the yarn might inspire me. I’m thinking about making Jared Flood’s Rock Island shawl with it because that thing is gorrrrgeous and designed around this yarn.

stash chicago

When I visited Nina, I was having so much fun looking at all of their yarns that I almost forgot to buy something. I know that sounds silly but their shop felt more like an art gallery than a store (I mean that in the best way!) so I didn’t want to disturb any of the yarns. I was also having a post-brunch buzz (banana bread french toast is a thing, everyone, and it tastes as ridiculous as it sounds) so I was having a tough time deciding. All of their yarns are beautiful. For some reason I was really drawn to a basket of Schoppel (Skacel) merino sock yarn. I guess I have a thing for merino sock yarn. This is just a wide self-striping yarn in shades of blue and grey, nothing too crazy.

I really liked that the tag has this big red warning that says, “Stricken kann suchtig machen!” which is German for “Knitting can be addictive!” Now you tell me!

All in all, I’m really happy with my yarn purchases. I don’t buy post cards or magnets or anything (I was looking for local honey but no luck!) so these are perfect souvenirs!

What kind of souvenirs do you like to buy when you travel? (My mom’s favorite is playing cards!)

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29
Mar

The Windy City

Written by Sarah. Posted in instagram, knits, life, travel, yarn

Jon and I just got back from a quick trip to Chicago! We’ve lived in New York for about six years now which seems crazy! I don’t think I’ve properly visited another big city since moving here. It certainly felt weird to be in someone else’s city but it was exciting to explore a new place.

chicago

I’m certainly no expert when it comes to Chi-town (unlike New York) so I can’t say that we did all of the things that you “have” to do while you’re there. (We didn’t eat deep dish pizza nor did we go on the Sky Deck. Frankly, the Sky Deck sounds like the worst idea ever. And I’ve been to the top of the Eiffel Tower. At least that had a floor!) We did some touristy things like visiting the Art Institute (a la Ferris Bueller) and the Contemporary Art Museum. We ate Chicago style hot dogs (they put a whole pickle on top!) and rode the El (L?). It was cold!

I think my favorite stop was eating at Billy Goat Tavern, the inspiration for its own all-star SNL skit. Their burgers are delicious and simple. The bar probably hasn’t changed since 1972 in the best way possible. The walls are filled with old newspaper articles and trophies. It gives you a real feeling of Chicago back in the day. The staff behind the counter are very no nonsense and insist you get a double cheeseburger when you order a single. Love it.

chicagolys

I also got to sneak in some yarn shopping. I mean, I had to! I visited Loopy Yarns and Nina. Both were absolutely lovely stores. Chicago knitters are lucky to have them! Loopy is a classic LYS, the type that I shopped in while I was in high school. Huge selection of yarns with a variety of prices, very well organized, spacious, and friendly. I spent a lot of time taking it all in. They even have a second floor for classes and more yarn! Nina has a really different feel and I love that. (Isn’t their logo awesome?) Nina feels more like a boutique. I love the way the yarns there are laid out, everything seems well-curated yet there is still an impressive selection of yarns. The shop looks more like a high end clothing store which suits it’s trendy Wicker Park location. All in all, both stores were fantastic and, as much as I was excited to return home, I was a little bit sad that I couldn’t stay and visit them on a regular basis!

I wish I’d had time to visit other yarn stores in Chicago. If they were anything like Loopy Yarns and Nina, I’m sure they’re awesome. I brought home a few wooly souvenirs but that’s for another post.

Do you go yarn shopping when you’re visiting a new place?

ps. Speaking of Chicago, Chi-town natives OK Go just released a new song! Have you heard it yet?

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